Yaz, Yasmin, Ocella Pose Risk Of Serious Side Effects
13
Oct

Since 1960, women in America have used birth control pills as a contraceptive measure. While the drugs have always been accompanied by side effects, some pills have caused worse effects than others. Public, scientific, and legal attention has been drawn to three drugs in particular, Yaz, Yasmin, and their generic equivalent, Ocella. Thousands of lawsuits are currently pending against Bayer HeathCare Pharmaceuticals. Plaintiffs claim the company has known for years of the serious side effects and that it failed to notify young women of the danger they face from taking the drug.

The Yaz lawsuits aim to win compensation for women who were misinformed or ill informed about the increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and pulmonary embolism associated with Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella. Thousands of young women in otherwise good health have suffered debilitating strokes, heart attacks, pulmonary embolisms and other related disorders in conjunction with taking Bayer’s birth control pills.

An article on the Kansas City Injury Board reports that the FDA warned Bayer against misleading advertising in 2008. The ads in question targeted young women and promised that the drug was safe and minimized the severity of potential side effects, the article notes. The FDA began warning Bayer as early as 2003 to encourage the company to properly document the serious risk of side effects and to remove and correct false promises in its marketing campaigns.

Recently, the collective frustration of thousands of misled young women has been consolidated into multi-district litigation in the United States District Court in the Southern District of Illinois. Other side effects the plaintiffs and their representatives claim to have suffered include gall bladder disease, deep vein thrombosis, cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden death in some cases.

References:

Emison, Brett. (September 27, 2010) “Did You Know… Popular Birth Control Pills (Yaz and Yasmin) Can Cause Serious Side Effects?” Retrieved on October 8, 2010 from the Kansas City Injury Board.